Current Opportunities

Please scroll down to see which opportunities are compatible with your major, field of interest, or future career objectives, then contact Dr. Andreatta for an appointment.

Opportunities below are open to all majors!


Title of Opportunity: How accurate are calorie counting apps?  (OPEN)

Contact: Dr. Richard Andreatta

Faulty Mentor: Dr. Jean Fry

Department: Athletic Training and Clinical Nutrition

Position Type: Academic Credit

Position Availability: Spring 2020, Summer 2020

Description:  

People often use nutrition and calorie counting applications in an effort to eat better and/or lose weight. Unfortunately, the nutrition information in popular apps are often unverified, and people have trouble recording portion sizes accurately. We are collecting diet records from research participants utilizing these apps then individually verifying foods and portions consumed with each participant. We will analyze the updated diet data using a standard research nutrition software package. This will allow us to see how the nutrition data automatically generated by the app and the standard research tool may be different. The student will help to verify diet data with research participants and learn how to enter the food records into nutrient analysis software. The student will have the opportunity to be a co-author on a research poster and/or a peer-reviewed research article.

Prerequisites:

  • Minimum GPA of 3.0
  • Friendly & enjoys interacting with new people and research participants.
  • Enthusiastic about nutrition, science and learning
  • Detail-oriented, organized, reliable/responsible
  • Preference given to students who can commit to multiple/consecutive semesters

Posted: 11/18/19


Title of Opportunity: Recovery of skeletal muscle following ACL injury (OPEN)

Contact: Dr. Richard Andreatta

Faulty Mentor: Dr. Christopher Fry

Graduate Student Mentor: Camille Brightwell

Department: Athletic Training and Clinical Nutrition

Position Type: Academic Credit

Position Availability: Spring 2020, Summer 2020

Description:  Our lab is interested in promoting skeletal muscle health and strength. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries result in significant weakness that is not restored with traditional rehabilitation strategies. This weakness prevents a return to sports/activity, increases re-injury rates, and promotes overall poor health outcomes. We have recently shown that ACL injury up-regulates myostatin signaling in quadriceps muscle, which promotes muscle fiber atrophy along with dysregulated activity of other cells residing within muscle (muscle stem cells) to reduce muscle quality through fibrosis. These changes likely promote weakness after ACL injury, and our lab is interested in preventing these molecular changes to improve functional recovery after injury. We have collected clinical muscle samples from patients with ACL tears, and the student will have the opportunity to perform immunohistochemical laboratory techniques on muscle fibers from these human samples to assess molecular and cellular changes to skeletal muscle and how different types of physical therapy may impact muscle health after the injury. We have also developed a mouse model to simulate the clinical condition in which we will probe the mechanistic role of myostatin on muscle adaptations after ACL transection. We will be utilizing multiple transgenic mouse models along with a pharmacological inhibitor or myostatin, and the student will have the opportunity to be involved in immunohistochemical, biochemical, and/or in vivo functional strength experiments using mouse skeletal muscle. Additionally, the student will have the valuable opportunity to be a co-author on a peer reviewed research article.

Prerequisites:

  • Minimum GPA of 3.5
  • Enthusiastic about science and learning
  • Preference given to students who can commit to multiple/consecutive semesters
  • Detail-oriented, organized, reliable/responsible

Posted: 11/9/19


Title of Opportunity: Recovery of skeletal muscle after burn injury (OPEN)

Contact: Dr. Richard Andreatta

Faulty Mentor: Dr. Christopher Fry

Graduate Student Mentor: Camille Brightwell

Department: Athletic Training and Clinical Nutrition

Position Type: Academic Credit

Position Availability: Spring 2020, Summer 2020

Description:  

Our lab is interested in remodeling and regeneration of skeletal muscle and how muscle stem cells contribute to muscle health and function. Many diseases and injuries negatively impact muscle health and functional strength, and we are interested in identifying novel pathways to restore muscle function. Severe burn injury causes excessive muscle wasting and weakness, resulting in delayed recovery. Our lab previously discovered dysregulation of muscle stem cells after burn, leading to impaired skeletal muscle regeneration and recovery after the burn injury. We have also found elevated expression of myostatin, a known negative regulator or muscle stem cell activity, after burn injury.  To optimize muscle recovery and regeneration, we are interested in pharmacological myostatin inhibition to activate muscle stem cells and rescue atrophy and weakness. The student will have the opportunity to use our transgenic mouse model in which muscle stem cells are depleted to examine efficacy of myostatin inhibition to promote muscle stem cell-dependent recovery of skeletal muscle after burn injury. The student will perform immunohistochemical laboratory techniques, including sectioning muscle tissue on a cryostat, staining muscle sections on slides, imaging slides via fluorescent microscopy, and analyzing microscopy images to generate novel data. If interested, the student may have the opportunity to participate in other experiments and gain additional laboratory skills using both mouse and human samples. Additionally, the student will have the valuable opportunity to be a co-author on a peer reviewed research article.

Prerequisites:

  • Minimum GPA of 3.5
  • Enthusiastic about science and learning
  • Preference given to students who can commit to multiple/consecutive semesters
  • Detail-oriented, organized, reliable/responsible

Posted: 11/8/19


Title of Opportunity: Eye Tracking/Pupillometry Study of Cognitive Load during Listening (FULL)

Contact: Dr. Richard Andreatta

Faculty Mentors: Dr. Isabel Hubbard

Department: Communication Sciences & Disorders

Position Type: Academic Credit or Volunteer

Position Availability: Fall 2019 and Spring 2020

Description:   

Have you ever wondered about the cognitive effort that goes into listening in noisy backgrounds? Do you think recording pupil dilation as an indication of cognitive effort sounds cool? Do you have good computer skills? Would you like to gain experience testing peoples' hearing?

The Language and Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory is looking for undergraduate research students to help support an ongoing observational study. We plan to recruit young adults and older adults and have them complete an eye-tracking study on 2 different days. Our aim is to measure the reliability of pupillometry (study of monitoring pupil dilation) in difficult listening situations within participants. 

As part of your work, you will:

  • Help recruit and schedule participants
  • Learn to use the eye tracker to collect pupilometry data
  • Learn to test hearing and screen vision
  • Input and organize data
  • Help in conference presentation preparation/manuscript preparation

Prerequisites:

  • Minimum GPA of 3.0
  • Detail-oriented
  • Basic computer skills
  • Organized and reliable
  • Have a cheerful disposition and a willingness to take instruction

Posted: 10/11/19


Title of Opportunity: Aphasia Naming Treatment with Brain Stimulation (FULL)

Contact: Dr. Richard Andreatta

Faculty Mentors: Dr. Isabel Hubbard

Department: Communication Sciences & Disorders

Position Type: Academic Credit or Volunteer

Position Availability: Fall 2019 and Spring 2020

Description:   

Are you interested in learning about treatment for naming impairment in aphasia? Do you have good computer skills? Do you wish to observe treatment? The Language and Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory is seeking student volunteers to support an ongoing treatment study for adults with aphasia. The treatment will take place in the UK Academic Clinic and involves non-invasive brain stimulation. We hope to determine if non-invasive brain stimulation enhances treatment outcomes following speech-language therapy. The treatment will be provided by a certified SLP, but there may be an opportunity for you to provide naming treatment, too. We have a need for undergraduate research students to also help us score tests that will document our treatment effects. This is critical work that will be the main measure of our treatment success and outcomes. It would be helpful if you were familiar with the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), but it is not required. We are happy to teach you all you need to know.

Prerequisites:

  • Minimum GPA of 3.0
  • Detail-oriented, highly organized and reliable
  • Computer skills and proficiency with Word, PowerPoint, and Excel
  • IPA background is helpful but not required
  • Have a cheerful disposition and a willingness to take instruction

Posted: 10/11/19


Title of Opportunity: Prevalence of Opioid Prescription for Isolated Ankle Sprain (FULL)

Contact: Dr. Richard Andreatta

Faculty Mentors: Phillip Gribble

Graduate Student Mentor: Kyle Kosik

Department: Athletic Training and Clinical Nutrition

Position Type: Volunteer for Fall 2019

Position Availability: Fall 2019

Description: In the United States, nearly 1 million people seek care annually for ankle sprains at Emergency Departments (ED). The current standard of care for an acute ankle sprain includes rest, ice, compression and elevation (RICE) combined with either supervised physical rehabilitation or home-based exercises to restore proper ankle function. However, some patients may utilize additional pharmacological treatment to assist in reducing their pain. A preliminary inquiry by our investigative team suggests the common CNS analgesic (>45%) prescribed for an isolated ankle sprain is Hydro/Oxycodone-Acetaminophen. This high prevalence rate of is a significant concern given the well-known consequences associated with the use of opioids in the United States. The purpose of this project is to perform a retrospective chart review to describe the outpatient prescribing habits for patients presenting to the ED with an acute ankle sprain. Selected students will complete the necessary paperwork for 'read only' access to electronic medical records and perform PI directed review of ER charts.

Prerequisites

  • GPA 3.0 or better
  • Preference given to students who commit to successive semesters
  • Minimum sophomore standing
  • Available ~2-3 hours per week.
  • Attention to detail.

Posted: 9/26/18


Title of Opportunity: Muscle Adaptations After Massage (FULL)

Contact: Dr. Richard Andreatta

Faculty Mentors: Dr. Esther Dupont-Versteegden

Department: Physical Therapy

Position Type: Academic Credit

Position Availability: Fall 2019, and possibly Spring 2020

Description:  Our laboratory is studying the effect of massage on muscle function and their biological/cellular effects. We use both animals (rats) and humans to test how muscle tissue changes in response to massage as an intervention and as a therapy. We are currently looking at the anabolic effects of massage, but we are also interested in studying the changes in the inflammatory response environment and the changes to the extracellular matrix of the tissue.

Students will participate in the analysis of muscle tissue collected from rats and humans after atrophy and following massage. The student will learn about:

  • the research process in basic science,
  • techniques related to analyzing muscle tissue,
  • muscle biology, and
  • the impact that therapeutic interventions have on the biology of muscle tissues

Prerequisites:

  • Minimum GPA of 3.5
  • Very detail-oriented, organized and reliable
  • Some experience and background in cell biology
  • Have an interest in working in a basic science lab
  • Ability and time to attend lab meetings on Friday afternoons

Posted: 9/18/19


Title of Opportunity: Return to competition over the first year of recovery following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (OPEN)

Contact: Dr. Richard Andreatta

Faculty Mentors: Brian Noehren

Graduate Student Mentor: Chelsey Roe

Department: Physical Therapy

Position Type: Academic Credit

Position Availability: Spring 2020

Description

We are focused on understanding the factors that contribute to an individual's ability to return to competition over the first year of recovery following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. We use a variety of methods to assess individuals such as strength measurements and functional testing. Students working with us will gain an understanding of anatomy and common clinical testing techniques with young active individuals. Students will be able to assist in data collections and interact with patients, athletic trainers, and other health care providers. We are looking for motivated students who have good attention to detail, strong work ethic, are interested in a career in the medical field, and enjoy working in a team environment.

Prerequisites

Minimum GPA 3.2
Must be willing to work multiple semesters
Must be available Monday morning, Monday afternoon, and/or Wednesday mornings
Must have own transportation
Preference will be given to students with interest in human movement science

Re-posted: 10-17-19


Title of Opportunity: Knee and hip injury biomechanics (OPEN)

Contact: Dr. Richard Andreatta

Faculty Mentor: Brian Noehren

Department: Physical Therapy

Position Type: Academic Credit, Volunteer

Position Availability: Spring 2020

Description

We are focused on understanding the underlying mechanisms in several common injuries that occur in the lower extremity. We use a variety of methods to answer our questions such as 3D motion capture, strength assessment and clinical measurements. We also use and develop computer code to process and analyze the data we collect. Students working in our lab serve in a variety of capacities such as observing clinical evaluations, assisting in data collections and processing data. The undergraduate students working in our lab gain an understanding of anatomy, common clinical assessment techniques, and joint mechanics. Students also have an opportunity to assist physical therapists in research treatment studies ongoing in the laboratory. Students that work in the laboratory for an extended period of time also have the opportunity to present research at national conferences. Leadership opportunities also exist for students who return for a second semester to help train and supervise newer students. We are looking for students who have a good attention to detail, strong work ethic, are interested in a future career in a medical field and enjoy working in a team environment.

Prerequisites

Must be current sophomore or junior
Must commit minimum of 8 hours per week (fall/spring) on the project
Must commit to multiple semester
Minimum GPA 3.5 GPA
Preference given to pre-PT students

Re-Posted: 10-17-19


Title of Opportunity: Telehealth Acceptance by Parents with Children with Hearing Loss (FULL)

Contact: Dr. Richard Andreatta

Faculty Mentors: Dr. Joneen Lowman

Department: Communication Sciences & Disorders

Position Type: Academic Credit

Position Availability: Fall 2019

Description: Access to highly qualified SLP services in some parts of the country and state is a documented barrier to some families with children who have hearing loss. Telehealth, the use of a computer and the internet to deliver treatment, is a growing and increasingly viable option for helping to connect families with much needed SLP services. To maximize the potential of telehealth, SLPs must understand what the barriers and limiting conditions are for a family to adopt and use this new way of treating patients.  Our study is designed to help answer this question. Two undergraduate research assistants will be needed to help in the transcribing and coding of parent interviews. Your role will be to help transcribe our recorded interviews and then code these transcripts. Accurate transcription and coding is a science and an art, and I will help you develop these skills. Once our interviews have been captured in written form, we will do some coding together. Coding is a form of data analysis that involves looking for and labeling common ideas in the transcripts. In that way, we can compare interviews and identify common themes that can help us better understand the process by which families decide to use telehealth to help their family members

What's in it for you?

  • Become familiar with basic principles of qualitative research methods
  • Understand the complimentary relationship between qualitative and quantitative research and how both generate knowledge/understanding in healthcare
  • Gain knowledge of open coding practices for qualitative data analysis
  • Enhance your understanding of evidence-based practice in managing communication disorders
  • Benefit from hearing the perspectives of "real life" families with children who have hearing losses

Prerequisites:

  • Minimum GPA of 3.5
  • Detail-oriented
  • Organized and reliable
  • Will be required to complete CITI training or provide proof of training
  • Flexible work hours
  • All work must be completed in CSD Telehealth lab

Posted: 8/30/19


Title of Opportunity: What really happens in a speech therapy session? (FULL)

Contact: Dr. Richard Andreatta

Faculty Mentors: Dr. Dana Howell and Dr. Joseph Stemple

Graduate Mentor: Maria Bane, MA, CCC-SLP (doctoral candidate)

Department: Communication Sciences & Disorders

Position Type: Volunteer

Position Availability: Fall 2019

Description: This opportunity involves helping with a qualitative research study, using a method called grounded theory. Grounded theory research is used to answer questions about "how" things happen (i.e. what is the process by which something occurs?). My study question is "what theory describes the interaction among patient, clinician, and treatment during voice therapy with an individual patient?" In other words, I want to know what the process of voice therapy is: how do speech pathologists decide what to DO with a patient? what factors do they consider in managing the communication disorder? You will be working closely with me, a PhD student, and under the guidance of experts in qualitative research (Dr. Howell) and voice disorders (Dr. Stemple). To collect data, I am conducting and recording interviews with speech-language pathologists who treat voice disorders. Your role would be to transcribe these recorded interviews. Accurate transcription is a science and an art, and I will help you develop these skills. Once our interviews have been captured in written form, we will do some coding together. Coding is a form of data analysis that involves looking for and labeling ideas in the transcripts. In that way, we can compare interviews and identify common themes.

What's in it for you?

  • Become familiar with basic principles of qualitative research methods
  • Understand the complimentary relationship between qualitative and quantitative research and how both generate knowledge/understanding in healthcare
  • Hands on practice with transcription
  • Gain knowledge of open coding practices for qualitative data analysis
  • Enhance your understanding of evidence-based practice in managing communication disorders
  • Benefit from hearing the perspectives of "real life" practicing speech-language pathologists

Prerequisites:

  • Minimum GPA of 3.0
  • Any major
  • Efficient and accurate typing skills
  • Good listening skills
  • Excellent organizational skills, dependable, reliable, and punctual

Posted: 8/29/19


Title of Opportunity: Muscle dysfunction and functional outcomes for survivors of critical illness (FULL)

Contact: Dr. Richard Andreatta

Faculty Mentors: Kirby Mayer and Esther Dupont-Versteegden

Department: Rehabilitation Sciences

Division: Physical Therapy

Position Type: Academic Credit

Position Availability: Fall 2019 and Spring 2020

Description

This project tracks how muscles change following stays in the intensive care unit and the impact that intervention such as PT, OT, and nursing mobility can have on preventing those changes. We are analyzing muscle size and muscle quality using ultrasound and we want to correlate those results with physical function such as gait speed, cognitive testing, anxiety and depression (resulting from hospital stays). Students selected for this research experience will assist with data collection, data input, and potentially data analysis of the ultrasound results.

Prerequisites

Minimal GPA 3.0
Junior or senior with pre-med, pre PT or pre PA concentration
Preference given to students who can commit multiple semester (including summer). 
Dependable, organized, attention to detail

Posted: 12/17/18


Title of Opportunity: Balance and Postural Control in Adults with Degenerative Neurological Disease (OPEN)

Contact: Dr. Richard Andreatta

Faculty Mentors: Geetanjali Gera

Department: Physical Therapy

Position Type: Academic Credit

Position Availability: Fall 2019

Description: 

Many adult degenerative neurological diseases manifest with challenges in balance and postural control including multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's Disease. In our lab, we are studying issues of balance and postural control in multiple ways. Selected students will assist with motion analyses, balance assessment, and neuroimaging to better understand the impact of neurological disease on function.

Prerequisites: 

  • Minimum GPA 3.4
  • Must be available to work two consecutive semesters (Summer 2019; Fall 2019)
  • Responsible, dependable and excellent attention to detail

Posted: 04/22/19


Title of Opportunity: The Impact of Dosing Parameters on Motor Skill Acquisition and Retention in Bilateral Cerebral Palsy (OPEN)

Contact: Dr. Richard Andreatta

Faculty Mentors: Susan Effgen, PT, PhD and Julia Smarr OTR/L, M.Ed.

Department: Shriner’s Hospital for Children, in collaboration with the University of Kentucky College of Health Sciences.  

Position Type: Academic Credit or Volunteer

Position Availability: Spring 2020 and Summer 2020

Description: Volunteer research assistants are needed for a study involving children with cerebral palsy.  As a volunteer research interventionist, you will work/play one-on-one (with supervision) with a child with cerebral palsy aged 6-17 years in a camp-like setting. You will use motor-learning methods to engage them in fun, play-based activities to provide intensive functional goal-directed behavioral training. This is a national, multi-site, funded study designed to determine if an intense (6 hours per day) motor learning intervention with children with bilateral cerebral palsy improves their function and participation, compared to a more traditional therapy approach. The camps will be 1 time per week for 15 weeks (Saturdays), or 6 hours per day for 3 weeks (Monday through Friday). Volunteers should be able to commit to all 15 days of camp (~120 hours. The camps will take place on campus at the Child Development Lab School. Physical therapy and occupational therapy will be involved in this study. All accepted students into this research experience must complete the Shriners Hospital for Children Volunteer requirements for service which include a drug test, background check, and the submission of 2 letters of reference. You will be trained to enter behavioral data and will also complete online training in human subject protection (CITI) and healthcare privacy (HIPAA).

We are recruiting 10 volunteers per camp on these dates:

Camp 1 - Saturday Session 1:   10/05/2020  to  1/25/2020

Camp 2 - Saturday Session 2:   2/01/2020  to  5/16/2020

  • These sessions run on Saturdays only 8:30-4:30

Camp 3 - Summer Session 1:   6/07/2020  to  6/27/2020

Camp 4 - Summer Session 2:   7/5/2020  to  7/25/2020

  • Summer Sessions run 3 weeks, Monday through Friday 8:30-4:30

Prerequisites:

  • Experience working with children ages 6 to 17
  • Experience working with special needs children is preferred, but not needed
  • Enthusiastic, with an ability to engage children in various activities
  • Dependable and very responsible
  • Self-directed, with the ability to work independently
  • Strong organizational skills and good ability to multi-task
  • Receptive to feedback and a team-oriented player

Posted: 8/29/19


Title of Opportunity: Dry needling treatment in individuals with chronic ankle instability (FULL)

Contact: Dr. Richard Andreatta

Faculty Mentor: Jennifer Mullins, DPT (doctoral student)

Department: Physical Therapy

Position Type: Academic Credit or Volunteer

Position Availability: Fall 2019 and Spring 2020

Description: We are looking for an independent and motivated undergraduate student in the College of Health Sciences that would enjoy learning about an innovative therapeutic intervention called dry needling, and also enjoy learning about the rigors of building an evidence-based treatment approach.  Our research team needs help to collect data from human participants during the application of dry needling treatment in individuals with chronic ankle instability. This opportunity would include an emphasis on data collection/processing/analysis and some knowledge of statistics to determine if significant improvements are gained among individuals with chronic ankle instability using our dry needling treatment. The faculty mentor will guide the student and help them learn the necessary analysis methods needed.  We are looking for someone who is responsible, able to work independently, and has experience with Microsoft Excel.  Any experience with software such as MatLab or SPSS would be a bonus, but are not needed to apply. 

Prerequisites:

  • Minimum GPA of 3.5
  • Prefer health sciences majors
  • Flexible hours available
  • Detail oriented
  • Familiarization with SPSS, MatLab and/or Excel is preferred.

Posted: 8/19/19


Title of Opportunity: Normative Values for the Yale Swallow Protocol (FULL)

Contact: Dr. Richard Andreatta

Faculty Mentors: Debra Suiter

Department: Communication Sciences and Disorders

Position Type: Academic Credit

Position Availability: Fall 2019

Description

Our lab is collecting data on how long and how many swallows it takes for individuals to swallow 3-ounces of water. The 3-ounce water swallow test is part of a screening protocol (The Yale Swallow Protocol) to identify individuals at risk for aspiration (food or liquid going into the lungs when swallowing). Individuals are given 3-ounces of water to drink and asked to drink all of it without stopping. If they cough after drinking, or if they cannot drink all 3-ounces without stopping, they are considered to be at risk for aspiration and may require further testing. We want to know if there is any predictive value in the numbers of swallows and time it takes to swallow 3-ounces (i.e. does it tell us anything more about swallowing behavior) for identifying patients potentially at risk for aspiration. We will be recruiting 60 individuals with normal swallow function between the ages 18-95. They will complete the 3-ounce water swallow test while they have small electrodes placed on their neck to record activity from several muscles involved in the act of swallowing. As a student involved in this research, you will learn how to use surface electrodes and the basics of electromyography (an important clinical method to measure and assess muscle activity in humans) and learn more about normal swallow function and its importance for the health and welfare of individuals across the adult lifespan.

Prerequisites

  • Prefer CSD majors
  • Min. 3.0 GPA
  • Occasional after-hours activities (after 5 pm)
  • Detail oriented
  • Excellent organizational skills

Posted: 8/14/19


Title of Opportunity: Increasing Communication Output in the Classroom Setting (FULL)

Contact: Dr. Richard Andreatta

Faculty Mentors: Aimee Sayre

Department: Communication Sciences and Disorders

Position Type: Academic Credit, Volunteer

Position Availability: Fall 2019

Description

In this project the student will work in a classroom in Jessamine Co. from 4-6 hours per week. The student will support a child with motor and speech deficits to fully participate in his classroom curriculum with his peers. Specific programming, data collection, data analysis and weekly meeting with mentor will be completed. This project can be for either 2 or 3 credits depending on the amount of time the student spends on the project. Time commitment will be one or two mornings per week in a Jessamine County middle school. Travel time is roughly 1/2 hour each way. Time in the classroom will be 2-3 hours per visit.

Prerequisites

  • CSD Major - Junior or Senior
  • GPA 3.7 or better
  • Interest in pediatric communication intervention
  • Highly reliable and detail oriented
  • Own transportation

Posted: 8/14/19


Title of Opportunity: Understanding the Pathogenesis of Periodontal Disease (OPEN)

Contact: Dr. Richard Andreatta

Faculty Mentors: Octavio Gonzalez 

Department/College: College of Dentistry

Position Type: Academic Credit, Volunteer

Position Availability: Fall 2019

Description: 

Our group is interested in identifying the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease, particularly associated with: 1) the role of host-bacteria interactions and 2) the effects of aging on the gingival innate immune responses. These studies seek to identify new molecular pathways that would provide the foundation to prevent/treat periodontal disease, which is still affecting 50% of the US adult population. For this, we use in vitro (cell cultures) and animal models combined with several molecular techniques.

Previous undergraduate students have had very productive experiences in our group with the opportunity to present the main findings at local scientific meetings as well as co-authoring publications in top dental and immunological journals.

Prerequisites: 

  • GPA 3.5 or better
  • Availability for lab work at least 6 - 8h/week for at least 1-2 years
  • Complete UK online training (4 courses) for working in the lab
  • Preference will be given to students with excellent academic performance, interested in pursuing dental education and involved in the research certificate program from UK CHS

Posted originally on: 7/09/18


Title of Opportunity: Qualitative Research Study of Cultural Awareness (OPEN)

Contact: Dr. Richard Andreatta

Faculty Mentors: Dr. Remer

Graduate Mentor: Carolyn Meiller

Department: Clinical Sciences

Division: Office of Student Affairs

Position Type: Academic Credit

Position Availability: Fall 2019

Description: 

Looking to gain research experience? The College of Health Sciences Office of Student Affairs is looking for a few high-achieving and motivated students to help with a qualitative research study related to cultural awareness. Students will be provided with training on the importance of qualitative research, how to conduct qualitative research, and how to engage in qualitative analysis through coding and thematic definition.

Prerequisites: 

  • 3.0 GPA or above required
  • CV and statement of interest

Posted: 3/26/19


Title of Opportunity: Feasibility and Efficacy of Two Methods of Delivering Voice Therapy (FULL)

Contact: Dr. Richard Andreatta

Faculty Mentors: Vrushali Angadi, Ming-Yuan Chih

Department: Rehabilitation Sciences

Division: Communication Sciences and Disorders

Position Type: Academic Credit

Position Availability: Summer 2019, Fall  2019, Spring 2020

Description

Maximizing effectiveness of evidence based voice therapies is the next step in the evolution of voice rehabilitation. With a lifetime prevalence of 29.9% and a point prevalence of 6.6%1 of the US population, voice disorders have a deleterious effect on both employment and social-emotional well-being. The intent of the current project is to enhance the delivery of voice therapy by using a smartphone application. This study will be implemented with patients who currently suffer from a voice disorder and have been recommended to undergo voice therapy. Selected students will be involved with data entry, voice therapy observations, patient check-ins and analysis of patient videos for usability assessment.

Prerequisites

  • GPA 3.0 or higher
  • Detail oriented, motivated and punctual
  • Will be required to complete HIPAA and CITI training
  • Preference given to students who can commit multiple semesters

Posted: 4/24/19


Title of Opportunity: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Risk Level Assessment of College Students (FULL)

Contact: Dr. Richard Andreatta

Faculty Mentors: Dr. Remer, Dr. White & Dr. Skaff

Department: Clinical Sciences

Division: Health Sciences, Education & Research

Position Type: Academic Credit & Volunteer

Position Availability: Spring 2019; Summer 2019

Description

This research opportunity focuses on assisting with the analysis of the raw data of a web-based survey that assesses the perceptions of HPV among college students. Students will also have an opportunity to collaborate with the co-PIs on the development of future research questions and efforts toward grant development. 

Prerequisites

  • GPA 2.8 or greater
  • Preference given to HHS and CLM majors
  • Knowledge of data management using Excel is required

Posted: 2/12/19


Title of Opportunity: Exploring Adult Hearing Loss and Social Cognition (FULL)

Contact: Dr. Richard Andreatta

Faculty Mentors: Anne Olson

Department: Rehabilitation Sciences

Division: Communication Sciences and Disorders

Position Type: Academic Credit

Position Availability: Fall 2019, possibly Spring 2020

Description

The purpose of this research program is to examine the relationship between hearing loss and social cognition in adults. Hearing loss is currently the most common sensory deficit in aging adults; it is becoming more than just a chronic health issue, but a social issue as well. Multiple studies have also revealed a correlation between hearing loss and loss of cognitive function and performance. Social cognition refers to the brain’s processing of social information, such as the ability to determine others’ emotions and how to respond to those emotions appropriately. While hearing loss is known to increase social isolation and create daily communication issues, it is unknown if social cognition is another cognitive domain affected by hearing loss. There is a critical need to fully explore the effects that hearing loss may have on all of the domains of cognitive function, especially given the impact that hearing loss has on everyday communication and interactions.

Selected students will gain knowledge in management of both quantitative and qualitative data related to this topic. 

Prerequisites

  • 3.0 GPA or higher
  • Strong work ethic
  • Sophomore or Junior status
  • Ability to begin in the summer semester 2019 and commit to more than one semester
  • Preference for individual with strong computer skills (i.e. word processing, excel) and ability to work with new platforms (i.e. Redcap) 

Posted: 1/17/19


Title of Opportunity: Investigating High BMI and Co-Morbidity in Pediatrics (FULL)

Contact: Dr. Richard Andreatta

Faculty Mentors: Aurelia Radulescu

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics- Kentucky Clinic

Position Type: Academic Credit

Position Availability: Summer 2019, Fall 2019 

Description

Obesity in children is associated with multiple co-morbidities and places them at risk of developing serious conditions in adulthood like cardiovascular disease, Type 2 Diabetes, Fatty Liver, Cancer. Our role at the pediatric BMI clinic is to evaluate these kids for potential comorbid conditions and treat them when diagnosed. We do this through comprehensive physical exam, laboratory screening, nutritional counseling, and multiple visits per year to properly monitor these patients. We also work closely with other pediatric specialties at UK to assist in treating the co-morbidities associated with obesity. Our BMI team (physician, two physician assistants, dietician, and CST) has recently joined in a research registry with 30+ sites nationwide to evaluate the data surrounding this patient population. This study seeks to capture anthropometric measurements, laboratory results, diagnoses, and medications. Selected students will be responsible for consenting patients to participate in this registry. Along with this, he/she will spend time each week assisting with data entry into an online software program used in this multi-site trial. This data entry consists of demographic information, clinical laboratory results, medications, diagnoses, etc. This is a great opportunity for a student looking to gain clinical experience and be involved in research. Students may have the opportunity to prepare and present a poster at a local or regional conference.

Prerequisites

  • Minimum GPA 3.2 and sophomore status
  • Preference given to students who can commit multiple semesters
  • Available M/W afternoon; TR morning/afternoon; PIs will accommodate any combination of these options
  • Preference to Pre-Med/Pre-PA students or students with interest in medicine or nutrition
  • Organized, attention to detail, good communication skills; team player 

Posted: 03/27/19


Title of Opportunity: Analyzing human tissue in health and disease (FULL)

Contact: Dr. Richard Andreatta

Faculty Mentors: Kate Kosmac

Division: Center for Muscle Biology

Position Type: Academic Credit, Paid Position, Volunteer

Position Availability: TBA

Description

In this lab, we are studying muscle adaptation to diseases including osteoarthritis, peripheral artery disease, and sarcopenia. The qualified student will be sectioning muscles tissue, staining muscle tissue and imaging muscle tissue. Opportunities for presentations at professional meetings and co authorship on peer-reviewed publications.

Prerequisites

  • Student must be available between Noon and 5 weekdays
  • Preference will be given to students who can commit to multiple semesters
  • Knowledge of Microsoft Office (especially Excel) a plus
  • Responsible and eager to learn
  • Outstanding attention to detail

Posted: 8/21/18


 

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